Saskatchewan Examiner

As hospitalizations in Saskatchewan rise, 3 kids are in ICU with COVID-19

As hospitalizations in Saskatchewan rise, three children are being treated in ICU for COVID-19

Key takeaways:

  • In Saskatchewan, hospitalizations are rising, with a recent report revealing that three children with COVID-19 are all in intensive care.
  • According to Kurji, as the Omicron variant spreads unchecked across the province, the number of children in need of intensive care will continue to rise.

Hospitalizations keep rising in Saskatchewan, with the province’s recent report showing 3 kids with COVID-19 are all in intensive care.

2 of the kids are being treated for COVID-19-related disease, while the other is being treated for an incidental COVID virus, as per the latest report from the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

This is from one incidental pediatric case and one COVID-related ICU admission on Sunday.

An incidental infection occurs when a person is admitted to the hospital for a reason other than COVID-19 but tests positive for the virus later.

Also read: COVID-19 in Saskatchewan: Hospitalizations continue to rise

Dr. Ayisha Kurji, a pediatrician and professor of pediatrics at the University of Saskatchewan, said she’s not surprised that COVID-19 has caused children to become sick enough to necessitate ICU admission.

Kids below the age of five, as per the Kurji, are not eligible for the COVID vaccine and are at a higher risk of infection.

“Those who have not been vaccinated are the ones who begin to spread the disease. It’s an issue to be concerned about. It’s something that concerns me as a pediatrician.”

As the Omicron variant spreads unchecked across the province, the number of children requiring intensive care will continue to rise, according to Kurji.

“We know that as the count of cases in the community rises, so will the number of cases in children. The number of children who will require hospitalization and, unfortunately, the ICU will rise within that. “Kurji went on to say that the province should limit gatherings to help slow the spread of Omicron.

An SHA spokesperson refused to provide additional information about the pediatric cases, such as the children’s ages or whether they were in the pediatric or neonatal intensive care units.

There are no new restrictions.

Premier Scott Moe stated at a news conference on Monday that he has no proposals to add gathering limitations to slow the spread of the Omicron variant.

“We’re not seeing those gatherings having a major impact on our counts in comparison to other parts of Canada where public health measures are in place,” Moe told reporters.

He claims that current controls, such as masking and proof of vaccination, are sufficient to keep the Omicron variant from spreading.

As hospitalizations in Saskatchewan rise, three children are being treated in ICU for COVID-19
As hospitalizations in Saskatchewan rise, three children are being treated in ICU for COVID-19. Image from CBC

On Monday, 262 people were hospitalized with COVID-19, up from 252 on Sunday, according to the province. The number of COVID patients in the ICU increased to 29 from 26 days before.

On Sunday, 1,629 new confirmed COVID-19 cases were reported in the province, the highest daily total count since the pandemic began.

That figure is most likely only a fraction of the province’s COVID cases. People who test positive on self-administered rapid tests at home aren’t counted in the province’s daily statistics.

With the Ministry of Health’s approval, Dr. Saqib Shahab, Saskatchewan’s chief medical health officer, modified a public health command that previously needed unvaccinated or partially immunized people to isolate for 10 days if they were deemed a close interaction of a COVID-19 positive case.

The amended order asserts that asymptomatic people who are partially vaccinated or unvaccinated can leave isolation for the “single purpose of receiving a COVID-19 vaccination.” They are only allowed to leave isolation to travel to and from their vaccination appointments.

The previous isolation necessity caused some people to miss their immunization appointments as well as delay getting fully vaccinated, particularly children aged five to eleven, who only became eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations in late November.

Currently, two weeks after receiving their second COVID-19 immunization, a person is considered fully vaccinated.

Source: CBC News

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